November State Legislative Elections

Alliance Lobbyist Kathy Lynch provides an analysis of the preliminary results of November 6 election. 
 
On November 6, 2012, Californians went to the poll to elect representatives from all 80 assembly districts and 21 of the 40 senate districts (odd-numbered plus one even-numbered special election).  Debra Bowen, Secretary of State, had reported a record number of voter registrations for this election (18,245,970 people or 76.7 percent of those eligible to vote.  This is an increase of 2.1 percent over the 17,304,091 registered in 2008.  Among those registered for the 2012 general election,43.7% registered as Democrats, 29.4% registered as Republicans, 20.9% expressed no party preference, and 6.0% registered as American Independent, Americans Elect, Green, Libertarian, or Peace and Freedom Party).
 
Results of the election will be certified on December 7, 2012.  As of Tuesday morning, November 13, 2012, many votes by mail and provisional ballots have not been counted.  Before the election the Assembly was composed of 52 Democrats, 27 Republicans, and 1 Independent. As of this morning, Democrats were leading in 54 districts and Republicans were leading in 26.  The Senate was composed of 25 Democrats and 15 Republicans before the election.  As of this morning, Democrats are leading in 14 districts and Republicans are leading in 7 (Senators in odd-numbered districts remaining in the Senate include14 Democrats and 5 Republicans, thus the potential composition is 28 Democrats and 12 Republicans).  As the election currently stands, there is the potential of the Democrats holding a supermajority in the California legislature.  A supermajority is capable of passing tax legislation without the threat of a Republican veto (the Senate needs 27 seats to achieve supermajority status).

 
This was the first election under the new term limit rules enacted under Proposition 28 which was approved in June 2012.  Proposition 28 limits legislative terms to twelve years; all twelve years can be served in the Assembly, the Senate or a combination of the two.  Proposition 28 does not apply to representatives in office when the proposition was approved.